Dating minton pottery marks

Mintons was a major ceramics manufacturing company, originated with Thomas Minton (1765–1836) the founder of "Thomas Minton and Sons", who established his pottery factory in Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, England, in 1793, producing earthenware.

He formed a partnership, Minton & Poulson, c.1796, with Joseph Poulson who made bone china from c.1798 in his new near-by china pottery.

MANUFACTURE DATES (a brief discussion) Introduction The approximate or a more specific date of manufacture of many 19th century British pottery patterns is known based on the general appearance of the pottery and pattern; manufacturers’ pattern books; correspondence; registry marks; invoices; and other sources.

This information is contained in many reference books.

Hard white unglazed "statuary porcelain", later called Parian ware due to its resemblance to Parian marble, was first introduced by Spode in the 1840s.When Poulson died in 1808, Minton carried on alone, using Poulson's pottery for china until 1816. The products are more often referred to as "Minton", as in Minton china.Early Mintons products were mostly standard domestic tableware in blue transfer printed or painted earthenware, including the ever popular Willow pattern. Within ten years he had enlarged the factory three times, built a china works, taken on the largest and most gifted group of artists in the Potteries, and developed for Doulton a reputation for craftsmanship and artistry still identified with Royal Doulton today. The following are two typical examples found on the patterns Rouen and Kew. The printed or impressed word HOLBEIN is also found on some examples of this particular ware.Between 1878 (when Henry and James Doulton acquired the major interest in the Pinder, Bourne factory in Nile Street, Burslem) and 1882 (when the name of the firm was changed to Doulton & Company, Burslem) existing Pinder, Bourne marks continued in use, such as the name in full: PINDER BOURNE CO.: and the initials P. Introduced in the latter part of 1901 to mark the grant of the Royal Warrant by King Edward VII together with the specific right to use the word ROYAL to designate Doulton products.During the 1820s, the Minton marking was simply two crossed swords.

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